Home > Uncategorized > Windows 7 RTM – Where’d my d: drive go?

Windows 7 RTM – Where’d my d: drive go?

One of the first things I do when setting up Media Center is to dedicate a separate drive for storing all of my recorded TV.  Been doing it since the very first release and “how to put an extra hard drive in your HP 873n” was one of my first newsgroup contributions.  With each subsequent upgrade since that initial release, I format the c: drive, install the new operating system, and then point Media Center to the d: drive to pick up all of the previously recorded TV shows.  I suspect I’m not alone.

I just about had a heart attack after installing the first beta of Windows 7 and all of my Recorded TV had disappeared.  I was most concerned about what my wife would do to me since I hadn’t properly backed up her audience appearances on Dr.Phil and The Price is Right.  Eek!

Turns out it was just a bug, and that the Windows 7 installer forgets to assign a drive letter to your secondary drive in certain scenarios.  It was reported and I had hoped fixed as part of the beta, but alas my Recorded TV was missing again after installing the RTM version of Windows 7.  By the power of Google, I hope that if you found your way here because of a similar panic attack I can show you how to easily fix the problem.

First, navigate to “Computer Management” by clicking on the Start Button and typing in “Computer Management” followed by enter.  You’ll notice here that all of your drives are listed including the one that isn’t currently working.

Now, Windows has automatically assigned the DVD drive the letter d:, but I’d rather have my Recorded TV drive had that letter.  So the first (optional) step is to change the DVD drive to something else so that d: becomes available for Recorded TV.  Right-click on the DVD drive and select “Change drive letter and paths…”.  This will bring up the Change Drive Letter and Paths dialog for the DVD drive.  We want to click on “Change…”.

Next, click on the drive letter dropdown to change “D” to “E” and click OK.  You’ll get a warning that this may cause issues for programs that might expect to find files on that drive, I haven’t noticed any problems since my DVD drive is removable media and no programs point to it.  Click Yes and OK to get back to the main disk management screen.

Now, right-click on the unassigned drive and select “Change drive letter and paths…”.  This will bring up the Change Letter and Paths dialog for the unassigned hard drive.  We want to click on “Add…”.

Click on OK to accept the auto assignment of the letter “D” and click on OK to return to the main disk management screen.

Windows will pop up the autoplay dialog once it detects the new drive.  You can simply close the window by clicking on the X in the top right corner, and close the computer management window as well.
  

You should be back up and running now with your lost drive!

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